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Stock Market Declines Further as 28 Firms Lose

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The nation’s stock market declined further on Tuesday as bearish sentiments persisted, making investors lose N4.8bn.

The market capitalisation of equities listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange dropped from N10.954tn on Monday to N10.948tn on Tuesday while the year-to-date loss stood at -7.3 per cent.

On Tuesday, the stock market drew closer to a two-year low level of 25,780.02 basis points on April 21, 2017 and a one-year low level of 28,780.02bps as the All Share Index depreciated by 0.04 per cent to settle at 29,149.46 basis points on the back of sell-offs in Ecobank Transnational Incorporated, Dangote Cement Plc and Dangote Sugar Refinery Plc.

Activity level declined as volume and value traded fell by 17.7 per cent and 41.8 per cent to 374.026 million units and N3.057bn, respectively.

The top traded stocks by volume were Sterling Bank Plc (119.7 million units), Chams Plc (50.3 million units) and FBN Holdings Plc (44.6 million units) while the top traded stocks by value were Guaranty Trust Bank Plc (N788m), Zenith Bank Plc (N471.3m) and FBN Holdings Plc (N323.1m).

Performance across sectors was bearish as all indices closed on a negative note. The insurance index led losers, down by 1.8 per cent largely on the back of losses in NEM Insurance Plc.

The banking and oil and gas indices dipped by 0.5 per cent and 0.4 per cent, respectively, due to profit-taking in Zenith Bank, FBN Holdings and Oando Plc.

The consumer goods index fell by 0.2 per cent due to sell-offs in Nascon Allied Industries Plc and Dangote Sugar Refinery.

Major losses recorded in Dangote Cement dragged the industrial goods index down by 0.1 per cent.

Investor sentiment improved to 0.8x from the 0.4x recorded on Monday as 12 stocks advanced against 15 decliners.

The top five losers were NEM Insurance, Ecobank, Livestock Feeds Plc, Niger Insurance Plc and Nascon Allied Industries, whose respective share prices shed 9.87 per cent, 6.67 per cent, 5.66 per cent, 4.76 per cent and 4.75 per cent.

Analysts at Afrinvest Securities Limited said following the mild improvement in Tuesday’s trading session, relative to the prior session, they did not rule out the possibility of a positive performance in Wednesday’s trading session buoyed by the improving investor sentiment.

“However, we advise investors to remain cautious while seeking for opportunities as we maintain our bearish outlook over the near term,” they added.

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Seplat Denies ExxonMobil Deal Cancellation

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Seplat Energy, on Thursday, said it had not received any official notification from the Federal Government reversing its proposed acquisition of the entire share capital of Mobil Producing Nigeria Unlimited.

The company also said it was seeking clarification from relevant authorities regarding the claims that President Muhammadu Buhari, who doubles as Minister of Petroleum Resources, had withdrawn his ministerial approval for the deal.

“Seplat Energy has become aware of a news report claiming that ministerial approval of the company’s proposed acquisition of the entire share capital of Mobil Producing Nigeria Unlimited has been withdrawn,” the oil firm stated in a statement issued by its Chief Financial Officer, Emeka Onwuka.

It added, “Seplat Energy has received no official notification of such a decision and is seeking clarification from the relevant authorities.”

Buhari had, on Wednesday, reversed his authorisation of the acquisition of the entire share capital of MPNU by Seplat Energy Offshore Limited.

The move puts the Presidency on the side of the Nigerian National Petroleum Company Limited which had earlier declined the $1.3bn transaction.

A statement by the Special Adviser to the President on Media and Publicity, Femi Adesina, had announced on Monday that Buhari consented to the acquisition of Exxon Mobil shares by Seplat Energy.

According to the Presidency, Buhari authorised the move in his capacity as Minister of Petroleum Resources as a way to attract Foreign Direct Investment to the country.

This was, however, contested by the Nigerian Upstream Petroleum Regulatory Commission, as the Chief Executive, NUPRC, Gbenga Komolafe, said the regulator would not and did not endorse the transaction.

Reacting to the development on Wednesday, the Senior Special Assistant to the President on Media and Publicity, Garba Shehu, stated that Buhari had reversed the decision and that the misunderstanding was because the “agencies involved in (the) decision had not coordinated well among themselves.”

Responding to claims on the reversal of ministerial approval, Seplat stated on Thursday that it had not received any official notification on the decision.

The oil firm, however, noted that it “will continue to work with all parties to achieve a successful outcome to the proposed acquisition and will provide an update in due course.”

It said the “announcement is made pursuant to Rule 17.10 of the Rulebook of the Nigerian Exchange, 2015 (Issuer’s Rule).”

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Wema Bank: Why We Are Delivering Value and Growing Our Numbers – Adebise

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The Managing Director/CEO of Wema Bank Plc, Mr. Ademola Adebise, has explained the facts behind the bank’s growing numbers during the half year ended June 30, 2022.

Wema Bank recently released its second quarter unaudited financial result for the period ended June 30, 2022, showing a 50 percent increase in its Gross Earnings from N39.82 billion recorded in 2021 to N59.59 billion H1 2022. The bank also grew its deposit by 43 percent from N968.17 billion reported in FY 2021 to N1.09 trillion in H1 2022.

Similarly, Wema Bank recorded a 43 percent increase in Profit before tax (PBT) from N4.30 billion over the same period last year to N6.13 billion for the period under review.

Speaking at the analyst’s conference and Investors’ call, Mr Adebise said: “Our digital channels remain a priority in meeting customer needs and closing the financial inclusion gap.

‘With a transaction value of N131.5 billion, USSD recorded over 58.6 million in transaction count (+55%), reaffirming our focus to grow channel usage.

“Mobile banking users completed over 42.8 million transactions within the review period, further driving the financial inclusion initiative.

“With over 50% growth in agent acquisition, our agency banking base increased to 140k accounts, at the end of the six months review period (H1 2021: >102k). This helps to further enhance performance across our financial inclusion initiatives. The value of agency funds transfer closed at N7.59bn in H1 2022, a 34% y-o-y growth. The stellar growth in agency transfer volume by 550k% was driven by signing-on of new partners”, he said.

According to the Wema Bank MD, the bank’s agency banking solutions will continue to provide support to customers mostly in the rural areas and hard-to-reach regions of the country.

“So far, we have over 21,000 agents attending to the financial service needs of these customers,” Mr Adebise added.

The bank’s Chief Finance Officer, Mr. Tunde Mabawonku, said the results point to the resilience and growth trajectory of the bank during the review period.

According to him, the bank has achieved efficiency in its balance sheet by managing growing deposits and rising interest rate. He also disclosed the bank has achieved an efficient mix of its deposit portfolio by bringing down the cost of funds.

Mabawonku hinted the bank’s N40 billion rights issue would open and be concluded during the year, a development he said would deliver more value to shareholders.

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Nigeria Makes List of Four Top World Bank Debtors

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Rising debt has pushed Nigeria up the World Bank’s top 10 International Development Association borrowers’ list.

The World Bank Fiscal Year 2021 audited financial statements, known as the IDA financial statement, showed that Nigeria was rated fifth on the list with $11.7bn IDA debt stock as of June 30, 2021.

However, the newly released World Bank Fiscal Year 2022 audited financial statements for IDA showed that Nigeria has moved to the fourth position on the list, with $13bn IDA debt stock as of June 30, 2022.

This shows that Nigeria accumulated about $1.3bn IDA debt within a fiscal year, with the country taking over the fourth top debtor position from Vietnam.

This debt is different from the outstanding loan of $486m from World Bank’s International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

The top five countries on the list slightly reduced their IDA debt stock except Nigeria.

India, which is still the first on the list reduced its IDA debt stock from $22bn in the previous fiscal year to $19.7bn, followed by Bangladesh from $18.1bn to $18bn.

It is followed by Pakistan which cut its debt from $16.4bn to $15.8bn, and lastly, Vietnam, which went down the list to fifth position, from $14.1bn to $12.9bn.

Nigeria has the highest IDA debt in Africa, as the top three IDA borrowers (India, Bangladesh and Pakistan) are from Asia. The World Bank disclosed recently that Nigeria’s debt, which may be considered sustainable for now, is vulnerable and costly.

The bank said, “Nigeria’s debt remains sustainable, albeit vulnerable and costly, especially due to large and growing financing from the Central Bank of Nigeria.”

However, the Washington-based global financial institution added that the country’s debt was also at risk of becoming unsustainable in the event of macro-fiscal shocks.

The bank further expressed concerns over the nation’s cost of debt servicing, which according to it, disrupted public investments and critical service delivery spending.

Economists have also raised concerns over the rising debt profile of the Federal Government.

The Fiscal Policy Partner and Africa Tax Leader of PwC, Mr Taiwo Oyedele, expressed his agreement with the World Bank on the high cost of debt servicing.

He said, “I agree with the World Bank. Although the debt to GDP ratio is not too high, if you think about the debt service cost to revenue ratio, it is already over 70 per cent. That’s when you know it’s costly.

“Nigeria borrows at double-digit, and even when we borrow in dollars, the rates are very high and then you devalue the naira and the cost of servicing the debt in naira goes up because it is dollar-dominated debt.

“Put all of that together, and you can easily say to yourself that even though our debt to GDP ratio is very low, our cost of borrowing is unsustainable because it is very high, and therefore, make it very costly.”

A former Deputy Governor of the Central Bank of Nigeria and former presidential candidate, Kingsley Moghalu, also criticised the increasing borrowing tendency of the government, urging the officials to re-consider other ways of generating revenue for the country.

According to Moghalu, it was also not reasonable to borrow for infrastructural development as the government could expand the public-private partnership options for such development.

In a document by the Director General of the Debt Management Office, Patience Oniha, recently obtained by our correspondent, the DMO stated that high debt levels would often lead to high debt services and affect investments in infrastructure.

According to the DMO DG, “High debt levels lead to heavy debt service which reduces resources available for investment in infrastructure and key sectors of the economy.”

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